Put Your Geocaching Search Here

Loading...

Friday, January 14, 2011

Geocaching and Photography

When it comes to the activity of geocaching there are so many side aspects that people can enjoy. In other words there is more to this amazing obsession than just finding Tupperware in the woods, for example photography.

Geocachers love to take photos. Either of themselves at the geocache site, points of interest around the geocache, etc. You would be amazed at all the fun, weird and exciting things you run into. Being in the age of digital everything it is so easy to capture our adventures. Remember the good Ole days when we had 24 shots of film and that was it? There was no "delete" and redo. You took your shots and hoped for the best. Those rolls of film were expensive too. Now with SD cards you can take literally thousands of photos and not even break a sweat. Remember when we had to turn in our film and wait over a week to get them developed? How things have changed.

The casual geocacher usually has a phone with a camera built in. This is extremely convenient to have with you at all times. Many of the smart phones have high end mega-pixel cameras that can rival standard digital cameras. I have found I personally use my phone camera much more now just because it is right there with me. Even beyond that the video camera on a smart phone gives you that option as well.

Digital cameras still have their place but I would hazard a guess that you will see them change in ways to make  them more competitive with the smart phones. I still use my digital camera because it can easily be placed on a tripod or on one of those cool bendable tripods so you can put your camera on a tree branch or hiking pole.  Let's face it, you can only extend your arm so far for a shot and being able to put a camera on a platform with a timer does give you more options. They are still very handy and can fit in a pocket or pouch while geocaching. A definite plus to have with you.

SLR cameras rock but you really need to be a photographer who wants to put some investment into the hobby. The rewards though are quite simply breathtaking. The main difference is the interchangeable lens. There is just something more crisp and clear with a glass lens as opposed to one you would have with a digital camera or smart phone. You also have complete control of what goes into a picture, light, speed, focus. It does really make all the difference in the world and it usually takes experience to make a photo pop. The nice thing again is you are able to save your shots digitally and can take loads of them. If there is one thing about taking photos no matter what camera you use is to take A LOT of photos. It costs you nothing and the difference between photo number one and number two can be huge. Take tons of shots! As you go through your photos you will see what worked and what didn't, that is how you become a more effective photographer.

So there you go. Geocaching and photography go together like peanut butter and jelly. If you haven't tried taking pix while you are looking for that micro or ammo box, give it a try. You will be amazed how many places you experience or things you will see and when you say to yourself, "Wish I brought the camera". It will be right there in your pocket. Have Fun.

-HHH


GeoCache: I'm NOT Obsessed... Right?
http://headhardhat-geocache.blogspot.com/
-------------------------------------------------------
Twitter me at
@headhardhat

Please don't forget to visit our GeoSnippits Geocaching Tutorial Videos Website at
http://www.geosnippits.com

3 comments:

Erika Jean said...

It's a great muggle cover too. Around GZ I like to act like I'm interested in taking a picture of something if people are around -)

P.J. said...

"SLR cameras rock but you really need to be a photographer who wants to put some investment into the hobby. The rewards though are quite simply breathtaking. The main difference is the lens. There is just something more crisp and clear with a glass lens as opposed to one you would have with a digital camera or smart phone. You also have complete control of what goes into a picture, light, speed, focus."

Though I am someone who has invested a lot of money in my DSLR setup, this quoted part isn't always the case.

A solid kit -- such as a Rebel with a lens or two -- is very affordable. And people who have been scared of SLRs can do a lot with these cameras. It's a great way to start up.

Further, some of the newer point-and-shoot cameras are just as good as some of the base-model SLRs in that you can do an awful lot with them. The SLRs are great for lenses etc., but some point-and-shoots are excellent to be able to do a lot of things.

Also, point-and-shoots have glass lenses. Same with phone, I'm pretty sure. Maybe you meant interchangeable lenses, but I haven't seen many "plastic" lenses, outside of the cameras that push that (Holga etc.)

Eirik2908 said...

Photography, oh photography...
A guestimate is that I take around 2-3000 photos a year, mostly during spring and especially summer. After I started Geocaching I've been at a few quite bizzare places, and I pretty much always bring a camera, either the SLR or the little point-and-shoot one...

Once a muggle stopped me and asked if I was taking some sort of land measurement photos... LOL!

A camera around your neck and you suddenly look like a photographer with a curious taste of motives...